ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MEANS OF NATURAL SELECTION

ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MEANS OF NATURAL SELECTION

(London: John Murray, 1869).

A BRIGHT AND PLEASING COPY OF THE RARE FIFTH ISSUE OF THE GREATEST BIOLOGICAL WORK EVER WRITTEN. IT IS CONSIDERED RARE AND WAS ISSUED IN A QUANTITY NOT EXCEEDING 2000 COPIES. This edition includes an expanded version of "An Historical Sketch of the Recent Progress of Opinion on the Origin of Species," as well as a table of corrections to the fifth edition.
"The fifth edition of 1869 was of 2,000 copies and was again much revised. It is in this one that Darwin used the expression "the survival of the fittest", Herbert Spencer's term, for the first time; it appears first in the heading of Chapter IV" (Freeman).
Darwin's Revolutionary Masterwork, in which he not only "drew an entirely new picture of the workings of organic nature; he revolutionized our methods of thinking and our outlook on the natural order of things. The recognition that constant change is the order of the universe had been finally established and a vast step forward in the uniformity of nature had been taken." [PMM) Together with Copernicus' DE REVOLUTIONIBUS and Newton's PRINCIPIA, it is deemed one of the three greatest and most important scientific works ever penned.
"The most influential scientific work of the nineteenth century" and "The most important biological work ever written" (Horblit, Freeman). Darwin's elaboration of the theory of natural selection laid the groundwork for the controversy over the evolution of man, and with only slight modification by such scientists as Stephen Jay Gould, Darwin's ideas remain the umbra under which most current biological research is conducted.
Darwin had intended the book to be an abstract of his 'big book' on transmutation, of which only the first part (Variation Under Domestication, 1868) was published in his lifetime.
"George Thomas Clark published in six volumes Cartae et Alia Munimenta Quae ad Dominium de Glamorgancia Pertinent ("Charters and Other Muniments which Pertain to the Lordship of Glamorgan"). This work reconstructed much of the medieval history and genealogical information of Glamorgan and much of the later history up to the 16th century. It consists of transcripts of some 1,660 ancient charters, numbered in Roman numerals, in their original language and spelling, which Clark had searched out from various sources including the muniments of Margam Abbey and Ewenny Priory. His familiarity with the names of old Glamorgan led him to produce another great work, on Welsh genealogy, Limbus Patrum Morganiae et Glamorganiae: Being the Genealogies of the Older Families of the Lordships of Morgan and Glamorgan.
He was exceptional among nineteenth century industrialists in that he earnestly studied the social well-being of his workers. At his own expense he provided a hospital for the Dowlais workmen, while the Dowlais schools, the largest in the kingdom, owed their success almost entirely to his direction. He was an early supporter of the volunteer movement, and himself raised a battalion in the Dowlais district. He was chairman of every local authority in the place." Wiki. Item #29497

Fifth edition, with additions and corrections (tenth thousand). A copy with PROVENANCE, the copy of George Thomas Clark, Victorian antiquarian, engineer and colleague of the great English mechanical and civil engineer Brunel, who is still considered "one of the most ingenious and prolific figures in engineering history", with his signature and shelf-mark. Folding lithographed diagram by W. West. 8vo, publisher's original green cloth, gilt lettered on the spine and blocked in blind in a panel design on the covers, original black coated endpapers. xxi, 593 pp. A very handsome and bright and unmarked copy, very clean and crisp throughout, the tips of the spine panel with a bit of rubbing or evidence of shelving.

Price: $3,550.00