HISTORY OF THE RISE, PROGRESS AND TERMINATION OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. Interspersed with Biographical, Political, and Moral Observations.

HISTORY OF THE RISE, PROGRESS AND TERMINATION OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. Interspersed with Biographical, Political, and Moral Observations.

(Boston: By Manning and Loring for E. Larkin, 1805).

VERY SCARCE, AND RARE IN THIS CONDITION, AND A HIGHLY IMPORTANT FIRSTHAND HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. The author was a leading female-revolutionary who counted among her personal acquaintances George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Patrick Henry, and most especially John Adams, her literary mentor in the years leading to the Revolution. Her husband, James Warren, among other important positions served as Paymaster General of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.
Her three volume history covers the whole Revolutionary period, from the Stamp Act to the ratification of the Constitution. Rather than being a dry chronology of dates, events and military maneuvers, Warren's book is written in a casual style. It is especially noteworthy for the personal insights and discussions of the people (so many of which she knew personally) involved; their characters, views, and contributions. The book contains views about the Revolution that at the time were still-controversial, such as her idea that the Battle of Yorktown, the final battle of the Revolution, was really not a battle at all. Roughly one third of the book concerns events after Yorktown.
Warren had originally opposed the new Constitution in 1787 as an Anti-Federalist but by the time of this writing firmly supported it. She was now deeply intrenched in the camp of Jefferson's Republican party, an unpopular stance in her home of Massachusetts. When this work was first published then-President Jefferson ordered subscriptions for himself and each of his cabinet members, and noted his "anticipation of her truthful account of the last thirty years that will furnish a more instructive lesson to mankind than any equal period known in history." The book's sharp comments on John Adams, the man who had once said Warren’s “poetical pen … has no equal that I know of in this country”, led to a breach in their friendship which lasted until 1812 and was never fully healed.
Lastly, Howes calls this the "first important historical work by an American woman." Item #29652

3 volumes. The Very Scarce First Edition. 8vo, bound in contemporary style full mottled calf, the spines with gilt ruled flat bands, gilt volume numbers and red morocco gilt lettered and ruled labels. xii, 447; vii, 412; vi, 475 pp., includes index. An especially handsome and fine set of this scarce work, the text largely spared of the spotting and toning that plagues American books of this period, the paper for the most part quite clean and fresh, the spotting and toning present being very mild and quite light, a touch heavier at the prelims and in Vol. III but still quite unobtrusive, Vol. I title-page at some time neatly repaired with only a bit of loss to the original paper in the top inner corner, the bindings are handsome and proper and in very fine condition.

Price: $8,950.00