JOURNAL CONTAINING AN ACCURATE AND INTERESTING ACCOUNT OF THE HARDSHIPS, SUFFERINGS, BATTLES, DEFEAT, AND CAPTIVITY, OF THOSE HEROIC KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS AND REGULARS, COMMANDED BY GENERAL WINCHESTER, in the Years 1812-1813. Also, Two Narritives, By Men that Were Wounded in the Battles of the River Raisin, and Taken Captivity by the Indians

(Philadelphia: Grigg & Elliot, 1834).

RARE, A VERY EARLY PRINTING PRECEDING THE MORE AVAILABLE LIPPINCOTT EDITION OF 1854 WHICH IS, GENERALLY SPEAKING, THE ONLY PRINTING AVAILABLE IN THE MARKETPLACE. This much earlier Philidelphia printing, like the original Kentucky editions, is seldom seen. Only one copy of this printing has come to public auction in the last 45 years while none of the Kentucky imprints have. Worldcat lists only 4 copies of this edition in worldwide holdings and a total of only 12 for all three Kentucky printings.
INCLUDES A FIRST HAND ACCOUNT OF THE MASSACRE OF THE RIVER RAISIN, at the Battle of Frenchtown during the War of 1812 and fought between the United States and a British and Native American. James Winchester, the second-in-command of the Army of the Northwest, led a column consisting of approximately 1,000 inexperienced regulars and volunteers, most of whom came from Kentucky. Major General William Henry Harrison had ordered him to remain within supporting distance of Harrison's column near the Maumee River (in present-day Perrysburg, Ohio) about 30 miles south of Frenchtown. Instead, Winchester ignored his orders and sent a small relief detachment north to Frenchtown along the River Raisin. Winchester's soldiers were largely untrained and inexperienced, and the First Battle of the River Raisin was the first combat most had seen. Events showed that Winchester's planning was poor. On hearing that the Americans had recaptured Frenchtown, British Brigadier General Henry Procter, commander of the British forces around Detroit, marched with his troops from Fort Malden and crossed the Detroit River from Upper Canada, invading Michigan in strength. Proctor surprised the American forces before sunrise on January 22. The American regulars stood their ground for only twenty minutes. These four companies of infantry, consisting mostly of green recruits, were caught in the open. They faced heavy musket volleys to their front, while they were also under direct roundshot and canister fire from six 3-pounders and were flanked by the Essex militia and the Indians.
At least 300 Americans were estimated to have been killed, with over 500 taken prisoner. Proctor marched any who could walk and all the uninjured prisoners north, but the wounded who were unable to walk were left behind at Frenchtown where most were killed by the Native Americans. The slaughter of the American wounded on January 23 became known as the River Raisin Massacre. It so horrified Americans that it overshadowed the battle, and news of the massacre spread throughout the country. Item #31263

QUITE RARE. A very early edition, the first Philadelphia imprint and the first printed outside of Kentucky. Howes list three Kentucky printings in 1813 and 1814 followed by this 1834 Grigg & Elliot edition. 12mo, in the printer's original paper-covered boards backed in black calf, the upper cover with printed repeat of the title-page within a woodcut border, the spine with flat bands gilt ruled, lower cover printed with publisher's adds. 1-78, 85-87, [1] pp. Lacking pages 79-84. A very rare book to find in fully original state, the text surpassingly clean and fresh for the period, the binding's upper cover paper is worn but still readable, some minor spotting on occasion.

Price: $450.00