ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke.
ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke.
ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke.
ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke.
ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke.

ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke.

(London: Adam Islip, 1600).

This is the RARE FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH OF PHILEMON HOLLAND'S SUPERB TRANSLATION of the great historian’s work on Roman history, originally written circa 20 B.C. OF A SUPREMELY IMPORTANT ROMAN TEXT. Holland's edition was widely studied in Elizabethan time and served as a major source for William Shakespeare.
“(T)he only English translation of any merit is by Philemon Holland (1600).” Livy’s account is of interest because unlike others at the time [Virgil, Horace], he did not predict an upward, linear progression of Rome. Livy divided the history into decades and his further division of subjects into 142 libri or volumina is thought to be his own idea. Livy’s goal in writing a history was to write the first history of the Roman people. For the people themselves, he believed something could be learned; “they are invited to note especially the moral lessons taught by the story of Rome, to observe how Rome rose to greatness by the simple virtues and unselfish devotion of her citizens, and how on the decay of these qualities followed degeneracy and decline.” His aim is not to develop historiagraphy per se but to write in testimony to Rome’s greatness as well as attempting to ensure that Rome did not bring about its own downfall through corruption and vice. “Livy was deeply penetrated with a sense of the greatness of Rome...But, if this ever-present consciousness often gives dignity and elevation to this narrative, it is also responsible forsome of its defects. Thus, it could be said that Livy’s approach is a ”didactic view of history.” [EB]. Item #31376

[Livy] T. Livius, of Padua. THE ROMANE HISTORIE Written by T. Livius of Padua. Also, the Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the topogrpahie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physicke. (London: Adam Islip, 1600).

Price: $15,500.00